Tata Nexon Overview

The Tata Nexon has been selling well and one major reason behind this has been the excellent pricing. Tata wants to be a major player in this segment and it is slowly achieving that with the Nexon. As an ongoing upgrade, the company has added a few important upgrades t the Nexon, which are not visible. This has been done to make the vehicle safer and also more user friendly. The projector headlamps of the Nexon have now been fitted with silicon pads. This has been done to endure that the wiring of the headlamps does not interfere with the projector units.

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This move eliminates the risk of a fire due to accidental contact of these components. Secondly, the infotainment system software has been updated. There were complains about the touchscreen system hanging and also problems with bluetooth pairing. The key fob off the Nexon also gets a new plastic cover to enable a longer life for it. Test drive for Tata Nexon.

The new variant had recently been launched in the Nexon. This is the XZ variant. At the time of the launch of the Nexon there was only the XZ+ variant, which was top of the line. This was followed by the XT, XM and XE variants. Now the Tata Nexon XZ variant sits just below the XZ+. This variant offloads some of the features offered in the XZ+ like the dual-tone roof, daytime running lights (DRLs), alloy wheels, front and a rear armrests, 60:40 split-folding rear seats, front and rear fog lamps, rear defogger, push button start and also the smart key.

Tata Nexon Exterior & Look

The Tata Nexon is a crossover in the true sense, blending a sub-compact SUV’s tall stance with a hatchback like curvy design. It’s similar to the Ford EcoSport in this sense, as opposed to the boxier Maruti Suzuki Vitara Brezza or Mahindra XUV300. Some may find the styling a touch too busy but it isn’t boring by any stretch of the imagination. The SUV traits of the Nexon are ground clearance, which at 209mm is comparable with the Renault Duster, and large 16-inch wheels. The high-stance is married with a coupe-like sloping roofline that rakes sharply like that of the Range Rover Evoque.

The unconventional design is eye-catchy, which should make it hard to miss when parked beside other hatchbacks and compact SUVs. The top-spec XZ+ variant of the Nexon that we drove sported a contrast-colour roof in steel grey with red, blue and orange exterior colours. The signature element is an off-white plastic trim that runs just under the greenhouse on the side. It continues at the rear too, but that’s paint and not plastic. Tata could have done away with it, but then, they could have overdone it too, which they have not. In the orange paint, this strip too is the same colour as the roof.

Apart from the grey roof and off-white sash, there’s another contrasting element on the outside – the black plastic cladding. It does its job of making the Nexon look rugged and high-heeled quite well.Look straight into the Nexon’s eyes, and you’ll get a hint of Tata’s ‘Impact’ design. The front grille’s top line extends into the headlamps, and onto the side. That’s the ‘humanity line’ in Tata lingo. The Nexon’s design is, however, more aggressive than its siblings. The elements that add to the bold front look are pulled back projector headlamps with LED daytime running lamps, high-set fog lamps, a large front air intake and flared wheel arches.

While the Nexon looks SUV-ish from the front, the rear is more hatchback-like. The high ground clearance is hard to miss, and the stock tyres (215/60 R16) look wide for a vehicle of the Nexon’s size. The faux skid plate on the rear bumper adds some ruggedness. There’s an off-white and glossy black element around the clear-lens tail lamps that adds quirkiness to the design. We’ve seen the Nexon around since 2017 now, but small nuances like these ensure the Nexon looks offbeat.

Tata Nexon Interior & Comfort

We are used to seeing interiors that are a big step up from Tata, especially on cars like the Tiago and the Hexa, and here on the Nexon, the carmaker has taken yet another little step up. The steering wheel and the instrument panel may have been carried over from the Tiago and Tigor, but the new central console with its gloss black and metallic finish and the layered dash create quite an impact. The dash is well finished, there are plenty of tastefully highlighted chrome bits, and the vents, glovebox release button and starter button are well integrated too. Material quality on the whole is good and the dash design is attractive, but the panel gaps are nowhere near as tight-fitting or consistent as those on some top German and Japanese cars. And there are some other odd bits, like the blank area between the air-con knobs, where you’d expect to see a temperature or blower speed display. The air-con settings, among other items, are displayed on the ‘floating’ screen at the top of the centre console. Tata says the screen’s high position minimises ‘eyes off the road time’ and it does display the essentials in clear sight.

The 6.5-inch screen is a touch-unit and is superior to the one on the Tigor and Hexa in size and response, but it’s not the largest or most responsive by class standards. However, if you can get used to that little bit of lag in touch inputs, you will like the screen and user interface. The infotainment system does without onboard sat-nav but there’s Android Auto for navigation requirements. Apple CarPlay will be added soon, though Apple maps does not work in India. We missed having an integrated navigation system with on-board maps as in areas where there is no 3G or any network, Google maps tends to fumble. We should have downloaded the maps of our test drive route, which is one solution. We must mention 8 speaker Harman system which is simply outstanding and gives you a level of sound quality never seen (or heard) before in this class of car.

There are plenty of well-executed, clever touches in the Nexon’s cabin. The massive cooled glovebox has recesses for holding cans, the front door pads have a smart holder for small folding umbrellas with channels to drain out water, and even the elbow box comes with a magnetic lid. There is plenty to speak of about the centre space between the seats as well. The offset-to-the-left (strangely) hand brake lever frees some amount of usable space, and Tata has used this space to create a storage area that runs all the way back to the elbow box. The sliding shutter that conceals this space is a real premium touch; the likes of which you’d expect to see in a Jaguar! Wish the flip-up cup holders inside were easier to operate though. Of the other things, some of the buttons on the dashboard are a bit small, while the rotary drive mode selector, borrowed from the Hexa, is too large for its limited purpose. The reverse camera could do with a few more pixels too, though the dynamic guidelines are handy.

You sit at a nice height in the Nexon and the driver gets a good view out, but the thick A-pillar can be obtrusive at crossroads. The front seats are large and supportive for even tall drivers, but, unfortunately, the steering doesn’t adjust for reach. Thankfully, the footwell is wide and accommodating, and that’s not something you could say about the other models built on Tata’s X1 platform such as the Zest and Bolt. Tata had to altogether reposition the ducting for the climate control system to this end. For Tata Nexon  visit planetm.co.in 

While getting into the rear section of the Nexon’s cabin, you’ll find yourself lowering your head to avoid contact with the lowish roof, and once inside, the relatively small windows also don’t give the same sense of space as you get in a Brezza. Make no mistake though – the Nexon is properly roomy with ample legroom and surprisingly good headroom too. You could squeeze in three adults in the back but the defined seat contours make it rather clear this is basically a four-seater. Thigh support is excellent, with a long seat squab and you even get an air-con vent in the back, along with your own blower control, which is a first in this class. However, in a bid to create more headroom, the back rest is a bit too reclined, but still not uncomfortably so.

As for luggage space, at 350 litres, the Nexon’s boot can hold quite a lot. The loading lip is a bit high but there is no shortage of space. The rear seats also split 60:40 and can be folded flat to free up as much as 690 litres of luggage space. Tata designers say that’s enough to hold a washing machine in its box; we wouldn’t disagree.

Tata Nexon Engine & Performance

The Tata Nexon comes both in petrol and diesel. It has a 1.2-litre turbo petrol that delivers about 108bhp of power and 180Nm of maximum torque. The Tata Tiago also uses the same engine, but it gets a turbocharger in the Nexon, for better performance. The power output is also higher. It comes mated to a 6speed manual transmission. This is something unique in this segment for a petrol vehicle.

The other engine is a 1.5-litre diesel engine that churns out about 108bhp of power and it comes with best-in-class torque of 260Nm. The diesel engine is the most powerful one in the segment and this also comes with a 6speed manual transmission. This engine is a four-cylinder one, unlike the three-cylinder one found on the Tiago. Both engines get multiple driving modes which are Eco, City and Sport. The Nexon is a front-wheel drive SUV and it does not have an AWD system.The Nexon delivers good fuel efficiency. As the petrol is similar to the Tata Tiago, it should return close to 13km/l in the city and about 17km/l on the highway. At the same time, the diesel engine will return about 17km/l in the city and 20km/l on the highway at least.

Tata Nexon Driving Dynamics

The Nexon gets McPherson struts up front and a twist beam setup at the rear. The ride is a nice compromise between hard and soft and because there’s not much body roll, it feels plush on the inside. It deals with potholes in the manner of bigger SUVs. So all you feel inside is a toned down thud and a little vertical movement that settles down pretty quick. The diesel Nexon is 68kg heavier than the petrol one, and the added weight results in keeping the cabin slightly more stable when going over a rough patch or at high speeds.

The diesel Nexon pays the price of the added weight when it comes to handling, but not by a big margin. The difference lies in the fact that the diesel Nexon tends to understeer slightly when you get into a turn while the petrol Nexon feels sharper in comparison. Overall, the Nexon feels quite confident on the road, and stability at highway speeds is not a concern either.With discs at the front and drums at the rear, it feels confident when braking hard. But the brakes don’t offer instant bite, thus requiring you to vary the braking pressure according to the situation.

Tata Nexon Safety & Security

Tata Nexon comes packed with a plethora of safety features such as dual front airbags, Anti-lock Braking System (ABS), Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD), Immobilizer and Seatbelt with pretensioners and load limiters as standard. The high-end variants also boast of Park Assist with Camera, Front fog lamps with cornering assistance, rear fog lamps and speed dependent auto door locks features.

Tata Nexon Price in Gurgaon

Tata Nexon On-Road Price in Gurgaon ranges from 6,46,080 to 10,65,568 for variants Nexon Revotron XE and Nexon Revotorq XZ Plus Dual Tone respectively. Tata Nexon is available in 10 variants and 5 colours. Below are details of Tata Nexon variants price in Gurgaon. Check for Nexon price in Gurgaon at Carzprice.

Tata Nexon Summing Up

If you are one of the many sold on the looks of the Nexon, you should be happy to know there is also genuine substance behind its style. Tata’s compact SUV is well equipped and made from expensive materials that make it look and feel more upmarket than its rivals, even if fit could be better at places. The needs of comfort and practicality are also abundantly addressed in the Nexon, ride comfort is really good and, as an added bonus, handling is excellent. Yes, the engines are not as exciting as their power numbers suggest but are adequate nonetheless.Fuel economy remains a question mark for the moment, but, as things stand, the Nexon is a fine package.

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